Posted by: chuckbumgardner | September 1, 2012

Reading report, August 2012

8/31/12  Andrew T. Lincoln, “God’s Name, Jesus’ Name, and Prayer in the Fourth Gospel,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 155-80.  Lincoln provides an interesting contrast of John’s portrayal of the prayer life of Jesus as opposed to the Synoptics; the different emphases are striking.  In sum: “what is distinctive about the Fourth Gospel’s portrayal of Jesus at prayer is (1) that it assumes the intimate relationship narrated in the synoptic Gospels as being one of prayer, but (2) that it heightens the Synoptic portrayals by depicting Jesus as so much at one with the will of the Father that he really does not need to petition on his own account.”  Lincoln does raise the point of definition of prayer: instead of asking “why doesn’t John portray Jesus as praying much”, Lincoln wants to ask whether our idea of “prayer” is too limited and suggests that “Prayer for Jesus in John’s Gospel…is a sustained spiritual communion with God in which he asks for and receives what is needed for his ministry, but without needing to express his concerns in actual uttered words.” (160)  I’m still wrestling with the notion of “wordless prayer”; it seems to me that the sort of communion Lincoln references here is something different than what Scripture considers to be “prayer”.

8/30/12 Stephen S. Smalley.  “Spirit, Kingdom and Prayer in Luke-Acts.” Novum Testamentum 15 (1973): 59-71. Smalley builds on the inaugurated eschatology of Perrin, and Dunn’s connection of Spirit and Kingdom in Luke-Acts, and tries to take a step beyond Dunn by making the Lukan theme of prayer an integral part of the Spirit-Kingdom connection he sees. Unfortunately for Smalley’s thesis, in most of the passages in which he sees this triad, he is forced to place one or another of the trio into the passage “by implication,” as it is not explicit in the text.

8/30/12  Peter T. O’Brien. “Prayer in Luke-Acts.” Tyndale Bulletin 24 (1973): 111-27.  General overview.  Notes prayer-related parallels between Luke and Acts.

8/30/12  Graham H. Twelftree. “Prayer and the Coming of the Spirit in Acts.” Expository Times 117 (2006): 271-76. Twelftree avers that while both prayer and the Spirit are themes in Luke-Acts, Luke does not draw a direct correlation between prayer and the bestowing of the Spirit. Instead, the correlation is indirect: the promised Spirit is bestowed on God’s devout people, and their consistent practice of prayer is an evidence of their devoutness. In Luke 11:13, it is not so much a matter of the Father giving the Spirit to those who ask for the Spirit, but (as Luke says) to those who “ask,” that is, who “pray.”

8/29/12  Daniel J. Treier, “The Superiority of Pre-Critical Exegesis?  Sic et Non,” Trinity Journal 24 (2003): 77-103.

8/29/12  David C. Steinmetz, “The Superiority of Pre-Critical Exegesis,” Theology Today (1980): 27-38.

8/21/12  Graeme Goldsworthy, “A Biblical-Theological Perspective on Prayer,” Southern Baptist Journal of Theology 10:4 (2006): 14-25.

8/19/12  N. T. Wright, “The Lord’s Prayer as a Paradigm of Christian Prayer,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 132-154.

8/19/12  I. Howard Marshall, “Jesus—Example and Teacher of Prayer in the Synoptic Gospels,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 113-131.

8/18/12  Stephen Farris, “The Canticles of Luke’s Infancy Narrative: The Appropriation of a Biblical Tradition,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 91-112.

8/17/12  Frank D. Galliard, “More Silent Reading in Antiquity: Non Omne Verbum Sonabat,” Journal of Biblical Literature 112 (1993): 689-694.

8/17/12  Michael Slusser, “Reading Silently in Antiquity,” Journal of Biblical Literature 111 (1992): 499.

8/17/12  Stanley E. Porter and Bryan R. Dyer, “Oral Texts?  A Reassessment of the Oral and Rhetorical Nature of Paul’s Letters in Light of Recent Studies,” Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 55:2 (2012): 323-41.  (See this post.)

8/12/12  Eileen M. Schuller, “Prayer in the Dead Sea Scrolls,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 66-88.

8/12/12  Asher Finkel, “Prayer in Jewish Life of the First Century as Background to Early Christianity,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 43-65.

8/11/12  David E. Aune, “Prayer in the Greco-Roman World,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 23-42.  Aune defines prayer in the Greco-Roman world as “the human propensity to communicate with supernatural beings who are regarded as more powerful than those who worship them” (25).  It incorporated a strong element of reciprocity, a central value in Greek society, and this feeds into the nearly universal connection of Greco-Roman prayer with sacrifice or intended sacrifice.  As well, “…thanksgiving and praise, which characterizes the Judeo-Christian prayer tradition, is largely absent from Greco-Roman prayer” (41).  And another contrast: Greek deities were often asked to “come” since they were not omnipresent, Zeus being the exception since he could see and act from where he was (32-33).  But “the Greek and Roman emphasis on invoking the presence of the deity, particularly at sacrifices, occurs only rarely in Israelite-Jewish prayers.  For the God of Israel was conceptualized as being always present — just as Zeus was thought to be always present by the Greeks.” (41)

8/11/12  Christopher R. Seitz, “Prayer in the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible,” in Into God’s Presence: Prayer in the New Testament, ed. Richard N. Longenecker (Eerdmans, 2001), 3-22.

8/10/12  Armin Baum, “A Theological Justification for the Canonical Status of Literary Forgeries: Jacob’s Deceit (Genesis 27) and Petr Pokorny’s Sola Gratia Argument,” Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 55:2 (2012).

8/3/12  Gary L. Chamberlain, “Protestant and Catholic Meanings of Vocation: Is Business a True Vocation?” in Business as a Calling: Interdisciplinary Essays on the Meaning of Business from the Catholic Social Tradition, ed. Michael Naughton and Stephanie Rumpza (St. Paul: University of St. Thomas, 2004), http:// www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/publications/businessasacalling/06Chamberlain.pdf.  This essay provided a helpful history (from a Roman Catholic perspective) of how the understanding of “vocation” has changed over the last half-millennium or so in Catholic thought.

The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods8/2/12  A. G. Sertillanges, O. P.  The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1998).  A translation of La Vie Intellectuelle (1921).  Sertillanges is a Roman Catholic, a strong Thomist, and bases his work loosely on Thomas’s “Sixteen Precepts for Acquiring the Treasure of Knowledge” (you can see Thomas’s list here).  Reading Sertillanges made me think of reading something written by Father Brown.  I wish I would have read this at the onset of my seminary studies.

Advertisements

Responses

  1. Hey, Chuck, have you looked at Grant R. Osborne’s “Moving Forward on Our Knees: Corporate Prayer in the New Testament” (JETS 53.2 June 2010)?

  2. I have now! Thank you.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: